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Once Upon a time: Cooking … Baking … Traveling … Laughing …


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BBB ~ Non, Naan

BBB ~ Non, Naan, Tashkent Obi Non

Recipe From: Samarkand: recipes & stories from Central Asia & the Caucasus by Caroline Eden & Eleanor Ford

Yes.  This is our Baker’s Dozen Anniversary!

Amazing that this little group of Bread Baking Babes has been around on the internet for the incredible Baker’s Dozen years!  I’ve missed very few of the breads the group has baked. There’s not been one bread in all those years that I haven’t learned from and enjoyed.  Most of the breads I’d enjoy baking again.  There have been simple breads.  There have been scary breads. When I started baking bread sometime in the 70’s, there was nothing easy about it and failure seemed to always be a possibility.   Baking all these breads over all these years has brought me to the startling conclusion that really dough just wants to be bread. Some dough will be more successful bread than others but generally, it will be better than anything that would come in a plastic bag and plenty of loaves will be as good as or better than the gourmet bakeries.  More than ever during this pandemic baking bread brings me sanity.

Traditionally this bread is never cut – a knife is an instrument of war. Docking the rim with an onion cutting tine makes it easy to break off sections.

How did I come to this bread? A long time ago I came across this thing called a bread stamp on Amazon. I’d never seen one, never seen a bread that used one, had no ideas why I should have one but I ordered two of them. They were beautiful but I had no idea what I should do with them. I took them to a baking class and ask if anyone had seen them used. Nope. …  Maybe a year ago, I saw a picture of bread stamps in a book I had and then I found the recipe for the bread.  SEVERAL MONTHS AGO, Elizabeth ask about doing this recipe and improvising or using the bread stamp. The idea seemed to take hold and I was way past due to try my bread stamps.  

Sealing wax! My bread stamp came in brown paper with sealing wax!


I think I baked my first loaf on 19 September 2020 and the second loaf on 20 September 2020; at this point I truly would only be able to count if I had taken photos of each loaf and I am pretty sure I didn’t take every bake.  
This truly is an everyday loaf. Easy to put together in the evening to rest overnight in the fridge and bake first thing in the AM. Easy to mix first thing in the AM and have coming out of the oven for lunch.  Easy to mix after lunch and serve with appetizers and/or dinner. I have not baked this three times in one day. No, I have not.

I really played with many combinations of flours but always totaling 200 grams.

When I put this up for the Babes I was really thinking it would be a great try to make it into a sourdough.  We were able to do that and it was nice bread.  In the end, for me at any rate, I felt the allure of this bread was the ease and everydayness of it and I went with the straight yeast version.  I know it will come to my rescue many times in the future. 

I also recognize that this bread has been made for centuries (many centuries), after all it is mentioned in the ‘Epic of Gilgamesh’.  
For the best article I found on this bread try http://www.aramcoworld.com/articles/July-2015/The-Fabled-Flatbreads-of-Uzbekistan .  There are multiple uTube videos. Two of the best we’ve found are:
this one shows you how to use scissors and a fondue fork in place of a bread stamp
and
this one shows using a glass
Just search for bread stamp or Easy Uzbek Bread or How to make Tashkent Obi Non 
You’ll be overwhelmed. but in a fun way.

You can do this without a bread stamp. You already have multiple implements in your kitchen that you can use. 

Items that might be used to emboss the dough. A fondue fork was used in the uTube video, I don’t have one.

I know the world is crazy right now and goodness knows I am way past ready to be done with the virus.  At the same time mixing and kneading bread is something of a saving grace for me.  This makes beautiful and tasty bread.  You can do it.  

BBB ~ Non, Naan, Tashkent Obi Non:

ORIGINAL

1 1/2 cups   AP flour
1 1/2 teaspoons yeast
3/4 teaspoons salt
oil
150 grams water
METRIC
200 grams flours
15-20 grams ground flax seed
7 grams yeast
6 grams salt
150 – 180 grams water, to make a sticky dough
oil, to knead dough on counter
VARIATIONS
60 grams whole grain spelt, total flours will =200 grams
60 grams bread
80 grams white whole wheat flour
15-20 grams ground flax seed
7 grams yeast
6 grams salt
150-180 grams water, to make a sticky dough
oil, to knead dough on counter
SOURDOUGH
STARTER Late the night before baking
100 grams rye starter
50 grams whole grain spelt flour
50 grams bread flour
70 grams white whole wheat flour
130 grams water
NEXT MORNING
3/4 teaspoon salt
oil of your choice

 STRAIGHT DOUGH Whisk together the flour(s), yeast, ground flax if using and salt.
Add water to make a sticky dough. This should not be a stiff dough.
Pour a little oil on the counter surface and knead the dough until the dough loses it’s tackiness and is silky smooth and soft. 
Cover and let rise till doubled in size.  Anywhere from 90 minutes to 2 hours.

2. Knock some of the air out of the dough and form it into a dome ball.  Set the dome on parchment paper and cover. The mixing bowl usually works well to cover it with. Let proof again until doubled in size.  This may only take 45 minutes to an hour.

3. Preheat the oven with baking stone.  I first baked this at 475°F. I have since baked it at 500°F.  I baked it under a stainless steel bowl but found misting the oven twice in the first 4 minutes worked best for me.  

4. Make an indentation in the middle of the bread by pressing with the heel of your hand.  I found starting the indentation with my largest ladle worked well and then I was able to enlarge it with my fingers. The indentation should be larger than the bread stamp pattern you plan to use.
Dip the bread stamp tines in flour. Pierce the middle of the dough with the floured bread stamp.  Press firmly to get a good imprint. 
Brush to top of the bread with oil, butter, egg with a pinch of salt.  Sprinkle with onion seeds or sesame seeds OR get carried away and make it your own.

5. Bake for 15 to 18 minutes.  The top should be golden and the loaf should sound hollow when tapped on the bottom. The center will be somewhat cracker like and the outside rim light and puffy.

SOURDOUGH: The night before I mixed starter, flours and water together.  It was a very wet dough. I did not knead it.

The next morning I dusted the counter with bread flour, flattened the dough on the dusted counter, pour the salt on the dough and kneaded it adding flour until it was smooth and no longer sticky.  The salt did not break the dough as I kneaded. I can not guess how much flour I added. 

Finally I flattened the dough on a parchment round and covered it with a large bowl.  At five hours later it had risen nicely.  I oiled the top and used my hand to flattened it in the middle then used the bread stamp to stamp it.  I didn’t get a clear stamp imprint; I needed a larger flattened center.  Sprinkled sesame seeds on the oiled top.

I baked the loaf on the parchment on a baking stone covered with a stainless bowl at 500°F for 15 minutes. Removed the bowl, turned the oven down to 450° and continued baking for 4 more minutes. Internal loaf temperature was 208°. 

We would love for you to try this bread. We would love to hear about your experience.

I really think you want to give this a go! To receive a Baking Buddy Badge to display on your site, post about your Naan adventure in the next couple of weeks (we love to see how your bread turns out AND hear what you think about it – what you didn’t like and/or what you liked) before … usually its the end of the month but this time I’m extending that a week so the date will be 7 March 2021. 

Here’s how to let us know:

  • comments my kitchen at mac dot com
    » Remember to include your name and a link to your post
    » Please type “BBB February 2021 bread” in the subject heading

And check out what the other Babes had to say about this one.

Happy Baking!


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Bien Cuit Caramelized Onion Bread Buddies!

Only two buddies for this 8th Anniversary Caramelized Onion Bread but they are both top quality!

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I am so happy to celebrate a first time buddy this month – Shirley Flourish.en Test Kitchen.  Here is a true bread head and a fabulous blog.

 

And I am super happy to celebrate our frequent no blogger, FaceBook friend Louise!  Louise is a quick learner baking bread.

IMG_3928“Thank you for selecting this truly delicious bread from an interesting book. I appreciated the clear instructions for S and F, although the tuck step is one I’ve yet to master.  The combination of caramelized onions and a hint of buckwheat was definitely a winner at our house. I baked mine on parchment on a baking stone, allowing it to crisp directly on the stone once firm. Great bread–I even bought the digital version of the book!”

 

Louise I also got the digital version of the book as we are traveling now.  It is a most interesting book and I know I’ll be baking from it again soon.

 

Thanks to you both many times.  It is a most memorable bread.


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Buddies Play in the BBB SandBox ~ Granary Style Loaf

If there is one thing Buddies and Babes have in spades, it’s free thinking creativity. If essay exams had only been like this in college, life would have been grand and fun. Probably we’d have come away knowing a lot more as well.

I feel like it’s more difficult to get many bread bakers interested in whole wheat/whole grain bread. Many of us were raised on that white stuff (I call library paste) and that’s what we’re happy to bake and see on our plates. Whole wheat/whole grain is more challenge having less gluten and the potential to taste bitter or funny or just not regular. For that reason, I am doubly pleased with Babes and Buddies who took up this challenge.

These are not in any special order because each really stands alone in it’s own special way.  That’s really how essay exams and SandBox play should be.

Granary Loaf was Judy’s first loaf in her new home, a christening of sorts she called it … I call it a spectacular loaf, just look at that marvelous crust.

 

Judy's Gross Eats

Judy’s Gross Eats

We got a great crumb shot from Karen who considers herself the “champion ingredient collector” but didn’t have any malted wheat flakes in her pantry. I really like the sound of that “champion ingredient collector” … I wonder how many of us feel that way … perhaps it would be better to ask how many of our partners consider each of us the “champion ingredient collector”.

Karen's Kitchen Stories

Karen’s Kitchen Stories

 

One of our most faithful Buddies Carola of course came through again after welcoming Tom Cruise into her pantry with a … globe continents and seas … well maybe I don’t have all those facts straight and you should check it out for yourself.

Sweet and That's It

Sweet and That’s It

For the crowning Crumb (and actually the first to bake in) and lovely bouquet! I would love to find some sprouted oat like Kelly did.  Her loaf rose gorgeously well, has a wonderful looking crumb and her son gave it thumbs up which is an A+ in my book.

A Messy Kitchen

A Messy Kitchen

Apologies for my tardy posting. I really was greatly needed by a friend in dire need.

Thank you all for baking once again with us and playing so well in the SandBox!

BBBuddy badge march 15


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Three’s Charm … Buddies!

I am always so happy to see the breads coming from the your ovens, I don’t know how to say thank you enough.  I do feel we have the very Best Buddies around and the three we have this month are all Charmers. Following in the tradition of Babes, each of these Buddies who made the Beaujolais Bread, made it their own. A true sign of a Babe.

beaujolais 1 rid

Our first Buddy reporting in was Carole from SweetAndThat’sIt.

She came up with a fantastic curve to the grape vine! I wish I’d seen/thought of shaping it that way Carole. Your grapes are terrific. Even though her family thought this was a funny bread, everybody seemed to love it. I think it makes any table a party.

Beaujolais Bread rid

Next we had Paola blogging at LeMieRicetteConESenza.

Paola’s first photo on her blog shows all the glory of the red Bardolino wine that she used. There’s a wonderful crumb shot … but it’s the photo with the salami sticking out that makes my mouth water.

merlot bread - finish - 10 picmonkey

On FaceBook, Renee, blogging at KudosKitchenByRenee, deemed herself a day late and a dollar short … I ask you, could this grape cluster be called even a penny short? Since I’m so late getting my buddy post up, how could I possibly call anyone late.

BBBauddy badge june 14
MerciBeaucoup! once again for Baking with the Babes.
Hope to see you again this month on the 16th when we have another stunning bread coming from the ovens!

 


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Our Buddies are Crackers! Great Crackers! Oh yeah …

Buddies … I can’t fully explain what bread baking means to me/us.  I know it’s all mixed together with the feelings of touching the physical dough, connecting with a long history of bread bakers through the centuries, befriending those around my kitchen table and that strange creative process of relaxing kneading.  It’s always fascinating to me that bread is such simple ingredients and is always different, glorious but always different.

Buddies … I can’t fully explain what our Bread Baking Buddies mean to me/Babes.  I know it’s partly all the above of baking bread but it’s something above that and extraordinarily special.  Strangers come into my kitchen, take a recipe, are willing to put time, effort and good ingredients into that recipe, make it their own and bake with us.

This time around I especially enjoyed Louise Persson’s words:

I’m pleased to have been able to bake this unusual recipe with the BBBs. I saw it posted at KAF sometime ago and thought I would never attempt crackers. Yet baking as a Buddy, I’ve stretched myself and added some new experiences, and happily, this was one of them.

I really can’t remember how I found the BBB while browsing through blogs one day, but I’m very glad I did! I look forward to each new bread, sometimes, like this month, thinking, “Oh, I can’t. I don’t have the time or skill.” But it’s amazing what we can accomplish, isn’t it?

Louise’s experience is typical of so many of us.  Perhaps I should be less emphatic, I do know Louise expresses what I experienced when I started blogging and it continues to this day even though I do recognize I have more confidence when I approach a new recipe.  Yes Louise it is amazing what we can accomplish when we give it a go.

On top of that empathy, what perhaps thrills me/Babes even more is to think that we have somehow influenced a few others to take up this BreadHead Cause and enjoy, experience, learn and share these experiences.

Bread Baking makes my heart happy.  Bread Baking Buddies make my heart happier.  I am so glad that you each give of yourselves and take time to bake with us.  You are truly very special people.  Thank you. Each one of you.

Our Cracker Buddies are (in no particular order):

Louise BreadHead without blog

photo

Corrine at Yogi Latte

Corrine

Karen at Karen’s Kitchen Stories

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Claartje at Claire’s Baking

crackers1

Cathy at Bread Experience

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Carola at Sweet and That’s It

3-Collage78

Renee at Kudos Kitchen

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Kelly at A Messy Kitchen

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Anita (Soepkipje) at Ipernity   

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Aparna at MyDiverseKitchen

Seed Crackers 6

Now do you see what I mean when I say these are are really special bunch of bakers!

Hope you can excuse me being late (but it did allow some extra Buddies to sneak in!) between company and that great mystery of the internet gobbling up my post requiring it to be redone … I was late.

If you baked as a Buddy and I missed you please send me an e-mail with your link and a photo so that I may include you!

You’ll excuse me now while I go bake these crackers again AND see if I can get baking on the Babes October bread.


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Our 5th Anniversary Buddies know how to do PIE!

I looked up quotes on pie and like the following two, even if they did get it wrong.

Eugene Field said

“But I, when I undress me

Each night upon my knees

Will ask the Lord to bless me,

With apple pie and cheese.”

he should have asked for Spinach Pie!

And that wonderful Garfield’s author, Jim Davis, missed it to, when he said:

“Vegetables are a must on a diet. I suggest carrot cake, zucchini bread, and pumpkin pie.”

No, Jim I’m sure the Spinach Pies would have fit the diet better.

My good friend Karen in her post about these Spinach Pies said

“Our differences make us a whole”.  And I say “Our Bread Baking Buddies make our kitchen complete.  We are BreadHeads”.

I do love to see how we all start with the same recipe and make it our own.  I thank each and everyone of you who has baked with us once or multiple times.  It is always a joy to hook you on the yeasties.

Our Buddies Make Our Kitchen Table Complete.  I revise many a recipe with new options after reading our Buddies.  I thank you all!

Sandie at Crumbs of Love


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Connie at Discovery of Bread

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Carola at Sweet and That’s It

BBB

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Our Babe Gorel posted on fact book.  I hope you saw her pies.
I’m trying to figure out what happened to my e-mail address disappearing and hope to correct that soon.
Happy Baking to us BreadHeads.